thehystericalsociety:

"Lu" and the sunflowers - c. 1920s - (Via)

humansofnewyork:

“I was the youngest in the family. I went to Israel first, and the rest of the family was supposed to join me. Nobody made it. We sent letters to each other for the first few years. The last letter I got from Poland came in 1941. It was from my mother. It asked me to send food. Then the letters stopped. I knew that the Germans had occupied Poland, and I heard rumors about the things that were happening. I never learned the specifics of what happened to my family. I never wanted to.”

(Jerusalem)

the-art-of-mourning:

Victorian lachrymatory bottles “Tear catchers”

"During Victorian funerals, men and women alike would shed tears for the deceased. A more upscale ceremony would distribute lachrymatory for the guests to capture their tears and aid in their mourning". From the reference book: "Mourning Art & Jewelry" by Maureen DeLorme on page 224. According to DeLorme these tears bottles are called "weeping bottle" or "tear catchers". She states that the concept is based on a verse from Psalm 56:8, where David returns from losing a battle and cries out to God, "Hast Thou not saved my tears in Thy bottle?"
This idea of God saving his tears appealed to the Victorians sense beliefs, and thus women would hold these vials up to their eyes to save their tears, and then keep them on their vanity table. Some traditional accounts, states DeLorme, hold that the weeping bottles would then be emptied over the grave on the first anniversary of the death.”

Source
Source
the-art-of-mourning:

Victorian lachrymatory bottles “Tear catchers”

"During Victorian funerals, men and women alike would shed tears for the deceased. A more upscale ceremony would distribute lachrymatory for the guests to capture their tears and aid in their mourning". From the reference book: "Mourning Art & Jewelry" by Maureen DeLorme on page 224. According to DeLorme these tears bottles are called "weeping bottle" or "tear catchers". She states that the concept is based on a verse from Psalm 56:8, where David returns from losing a battle and cries out to God, "Hast Thou not saved my tears in Thy bottle?"
This idea of God saving his tears appealed to the Victorians sense beliefs, and thus women would hold these vials up to their eyes to save their tears, and then keep them on their vanity table. Some traditional accounts, states DeLorme, hold that the weeping bottles would then be emptied over the grave on the first anniversary of the death.”

Source
Source

the-art-of-mourning:

Victorian lachrymatory bottles “Tear catchers”

"During Victorian funerals, men and women alike would shed tears for the deceased. A more upscale ceremony would distribute lachrymatory for the guests to capture their tears and aid in their mourning". From the reference book: "Mourning Art & Jewelry" by Maureen DeLorme on page 224. According to DeLorme these tears bottles are called "weeping bottle" or "tear catchers". She states that the concept is based on a verse from Psalm 56:8, where David returns from losing a battle and cries out to God, "Hast Thou not saved my tears in Thy bottle?"

This idea of God saving his tears appealed to the Victorians sense beliefs, and thus women would hold these vials up to their eyes to save their tears, and then keep them on their vanity table. Some traditional accounts, states DeLorme, hold that the weeping bottles would then be emptied over the grave on the first anniversary of the death.”

comedycentral:

Click here to watch Stephen Colbert take a look at impossible beauty standards on The Colbert Report.
Meanwhile, full episodes of The Report are always available on the Comedy Central app. comedycentral:

Click here to watch Stephen Colbert take a look at impossible beauty standards on The Colbert Report.
Meanwhile, full episodes of The Report are always available on the Comedy Central app.

comedycentral:

Click here to watch Stephen Colbert take a look at impossible beauty standards on The Colbert Report.

Meanwhile, full episodes of The Report are always available on the Comedy Central app.

fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

Tom Lehrer is a mathematician, satirist and pianist known for his parody “pop” songs making fun of world events… and math. Championing anti-nuclear war efforts and the political left, he stopped giving performances in protest against the escalating state of US-Russia tensions and the failing of world peace organizations such as the UN. You can watch many of his parody songs such as “National Brotherhood Week,” “We Will All Go Together when We Go” and “New Math” on Youtube.

Also his sensitive intellectual look was on point. Dem glasses, girl.

fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

Tom Lehrer is a mathematician, satirist and pianist known for his parody “pop” songs making fun of world events… and math. Championing anti-nuclear war efforts and the political left, he stopped giving performances in protest against the escalating state of US-Russia tensions and the failing of world peace organizations such as the UN. You can watch many of his parody songs such as “National Brotherhood Week,” “We Will All Go Together when We Go” and “New Math” on Youtube.

Also his sensitive intellectual look was on point. Dem glasses, girl.

feuille-d-automne:

The Late Riser by William Herman Rau, C.1900 .

(via hoop-skirts-and-corsets)

fortheloveofsequins:

Valentino S/S 15